More from: Qindows 10

Windows 9 Now With Everything We Tried To Tell You Didn’t Want In Windows 8

From Extreme Tech

 

ccording to the latest leaks out of Microsoft, the next major version of Windows — Windows 9, Windows Threshold — will kill off the Charms bar. And, if that wasn’t enough to win back the droves of Desktop users who were scared off by the disgusting blight of Windows 8 Metroficiation, Windows 9 will also have virtual desktops! Yes, it would seem Microsoft is serious about making Windows a first-class operating system for mouse-and-keyboard users yet again.

If you’ve never used Windows 8, the Charms bar is one of the many abominable Metro-style additions that unfortunately also made it to the Desktop. The Charms bar is accessed by pushing your mouse into a corner of the screen, and then delicately moving your pointer up the edge of the screen to the necessary button (Share, Search, Devices, or Settings). This is probably one of the most uncomfortable UI interactions in computing history. The Charms bar is actually pretty slick on a touchscreen, where it’s comfortably accessed with your thumb, but we’ll probably never know why Microsoft also made mouse-and-keyboard users interact with it.

According to various sources, current internal alpha builds of Windows Threshold do not have the Charms bar. It isn’t clear if the Charms bar is only being removed from the Desktop, or from the Metro interface as well. Metro apps, which currently rely on the Charms bar for sharing and settings, will be changed so that these functions are exposed elsewhere. Don’t forget that Windows 9 will also allow for Metro apps to be run on the Desktop in a window — in which case, the working theory is that these Metro-on-Desktop apps will gain a Settings button in the top corner of the title bar, along with minimize and close. Desktop users will go back to using the resurrected Start menu and system tray — if they ever stopped using them in the first place, anyway

So far, then, so good — Microsoft has (finally) realized that Windows 8 offers very little for mouse-and-keyboard users, which still make up the vast majority of its user base. These changes are clearly targeted at creating significant distance between Windows 8 and Windows 9, and thus hopefully regaining the trust and affection of the lucrative enterprise market which has signaled that it’s more than happy to hold onto Windows XP and Windows 7 rather than attempt a painful upgrade to Windows 8.