Why Did Someone Infect My Computer…

By far the number one question I get from customers is
“Why do people write viruses?” 
Most people are totally mystified as to why someone would do it.  First lets clear up one thing a ton of people
do not understand;  you are not the
target, your computer is.  Unless you are
a Chinese protester  Have some information useful to the CIA, or are working in
Iranian uranium enrichment facility you are probably not of interest to anyone.

In some cases they  might be after your information.  However the majority of the time they simply
want your computers internet connection and computing power to perform tasks
for them.   To either infect other computers,
click on ads for them, send out spam e-mails which try to get people to buy
bogus products…

Also despite what conspiracy minded people like to think,
the people who sell anti-virus programs are not the ones writing viruses.

As Brian Krebs has pointed out wonderfully

nearly every aspect of a hacked computer and a user’s online
life can be and has been commoditized. If it has value and can be resold, you
can be sure there is a service or product offered in the cybercriminal
underground to monetize it. I haven’t yet found an exception to this rule.”

Have a Facebook account, they want that to SEO
spam links, or to post links to infect your friends, so your accounts can post
more links generating more clicks, or trick your friends into installing
hostageware.   Remember in the online
world clicks equal revenue.  Either
directly through ad programs, selling DDoS attacks… Being able to use a
computer that is connected to the internet is valuable.  Being able to control a million computers
connected to the internet is an almost limitless source of revenue.  That is mostly what they are after.

Brian has more info and a very nice infographic on this at his site:

https://krebsonsecurity.com/2012/10/the-scrap-value-of-a-hacked-pc-revisited/

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