Clover Terrible Customer Service

So my bank switched over to using Clover for credit card processing. In a mater of minutes I have found there app to be incredibly buggy.

Clover support has been spending two days blowing me off and blaming the phone.

Even if the issue is a compatibility issue with the phone this is no excuse for Clover to ignore the issue and blow me off.

What other bugs are they ignoring and blaming on the phone?

Clover seems to be becoming ubiquitous, you know those big fancy looking white touch screen cash registers that look they were designed by Apple, that’s Clover. They have taken over processing for the largest banks. I’m very nervous about running a credit card through a Clover terminal.


If You Force People To Constantly Change Passwords They Do Bad Things With Passwords

My own anecdotal experience with this is in 100% of cases where people where to constantly change passwords they either added a digit to the password or wrote the password on a sticky note somewhere in plain site of the computer.

From Ars

The most on-point data comes from a study published in 2010 by researchers from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. The researchers obtained the cryptographic hashes to 10,000 expired accounts that once belonged to university employees, faculty, or students who had been required to change their passcodes every three months. Researchers received data not only for the last password used but also for passwords that had been changed over time.

By studying the data, the researchers identified common techniques account holders used when they were required to change passwords. A password like “tarheels#1”, for instance (excluding the quotation marks) frequently became “tArheels#1” after the first change, “taRheels#1” on the second change and so on. Or it might be changed to “tarheels#11” on the first change and “tarheels#111” on the second. Another common technique was to substitute a digit to make it “tarheels#2”, “tarheels#3”, and so on.

“The UNC researchers said if people have to change their passwords every 90 days, they tend to use a pattern and they do what we call a transformation,” Cranor explained. “They take their old passwords, they change it in some small way, and they come up with a new password.”

The researchers used the transformations they uncovered to develop algorithms that were able to predict changes with great accuracy. Then they simulated real-world cracking to see how well they performed. In online attacks, in which attackers try to make as many guesses as possible before the targeted network locks them out, the algorithm cracked 17 percent of the accounts in fewer than five attempts. In offline attacks performed on the recovered hashes using superfast computers, 41 percent of the changed passwords were cracked within three seconds.

 


“Unlimited”

“Unlimited” you keep using that word, I do not think it means what you think it means.

http://arstechnica.com/information-technology/2016/07/verizon-to-disconnect-unlimited-data-customers-who-use-over-100gbmonth/

Verizon Wireless customers who have held on to unlimited data plans and use significantly more than 100GB a month will be disconnected from the network on August 31 unless they agree to move to limited data packages that require payment of overage fees.

Verizon stopped offering unlimited data to new smartphone customers in 2011, but some customers have been able to hang on to the old plans instead of switching to ones with monthly data limits. Verizon has tried to convert the holdouts by raising the price $20 a month and occasionally throttling heavy users but stopped that practice after net neutrality rules took effect. Now Verizon is implementing a formal policy for disconnecting the heaviest users.



STOP USING NORTON!

In fact sop using all AV, it’s best to just stick with Windows built in free security. You are just as secure, it doesn’t hog resources, and at least you are not paying for the privilege of software that makes you totally vulnerable to comically easy to perform attacks that can take over your computer. This is just the latest and worst example of incredibly sever security holes found in security software.

http://arstechnica.com/security/2016/06/25-symantec-products-open-to-wormable-attack-by-unopened-e-mail-or-links

Much of the product line from security firm Symantec contains a raft of vulnerabilities that expose millions of consumers, small businesses, and large organizations to self-replicating attacks that take complete control of their computers, a researcher warned Tuesday.

“These vulnerabilities are as bad as it gets,” Tavis Ormandy, a researcher with Google’s Project Zero,wrote in a blog post. “They don’t require any user interaction, they affect the default configuration, and the software runs at the highest privilege levels possible. In certain cases on Windows, vulnerable code is even loaded into the kernel, resulting in remote kernel memory corruption.”

The post was published shortly after Symantec issued its own advisory, which listed 17 Symantec enterprise products and eight Norton consumer and small business products being affected. Ormandy warned that the vulnerability is unusually easy to exploit, allowing the exploits to spread virally from machine to machine over a targeted network, or potentially over the Internet at large. Ormandy continued:

Because Symantec uses a filter driver to intercept all system I/O, just emailing a file to a victim or sending them a link to an exploit is enough to trigger it – the victim does not need to open the file or interact with it in anyway. Because no interaction is necessary to exploit it, this is a wormable vulnerability with potentially devastating consequences to Norton and Symantec customers.

An attacker could easily compromise an entire enterprise fleet using a vulnerability like this. Network administrators should keep scenarios like this in mind when deciding to deploy Antivirus, it’s a significant tradeoff in terms of increasing attack surface.

The flaws reside in the engine the products use to reverse the compression tools malware developers use to conceal their malicious payloads. The unpackers work by parsing code contained in files before they’re allowed to be downloaded or executed. Because Symantec runs the unpackers directly in the operating system kernel, errors can allow attackers to gain complete control over the vulnerable machine. Ormandy said a better design would be for unpackers to run in a security “sandbox,” which isolates untrusted code from sensitive parts of an operating system.

The researcher said one of the proof-of-concept exploits he devised works by exposing the unpacker to odd-sized records that cause inputs to be incorrectly rounded-up, resulting in a buffer overflow. A separate “decomposer library” included in the vulnerable software contained open-source code that in some cases hadn’t been updated in at least seven years. The lack of updates came even though vulnerabilities had been found in some of the aging code and in some cases the disclosures were accompanied by publicly available exploits. A list of additional vulnerabilities is here.

Tuesday’s advisory is only the latest to underscore game-over vulnerabilities found in widely available antivirus packages. Although the software is often considered a mandatory part of a good security regimen—on Windows systems, at least—their installation often has the paradoxical consequence of opening a computer to attacks that otherwise wouldn’t be possible. Over the past five years, Ormandy in particular has exposed a disturbingly high number of such flaws in security software from companies including Comodo, Eset, Kaspersky, FireEye, McAfee, Trend Micro, andothers.

In most cases, the updates disclosed Tuesday will be automatically installed, in much the way virus definitions are received. In other cases, end users or administrators will have to manually install the fixes. People running Symantec software should check the advisory to make sure they’re covered.